Personal Imperative

Conversations from the Edge

Welcome to the CRC blog, where we discuss bleeding edge issues around sustainable community development. The term ‘bleeding edge’ connotes the idea of our failure to somehow or other convince the publics about the urgency of responding to climate change now, and that we need to better communicate the principles and practises of sustainable development to the wider publics. So, yes it takes courage to be 'at the edge', and sometimes one 'bleeds' a lot, but let's start the conversation now.

A Personal Note

When my son was alive, we used to talk a lot about existential loneliness, part of the human condition. But a far greater loneliness is pervading modern human society, as reported in this article by Elizabeth Renzetti, entitled, "Being alone together" in last Saturday's Globe and Mail.

Edging Forward. The Power of Stories

Do conversations create common ground across generations? Not the old guy on the way out, but a role to play going forward. Giving away stuff now and sharing with friends and family, and maybe even strangers, a ritual about less than dying but opening the door about whatever comes next.

Edging Forward: The Biodiversity Imperative

This week the world mourned the death of Sudan, the last of his kind: a male northern white rhino, kept in captivity for his own protection. Now the survival of this subspecies depends upon his daughter and granddaughter, and the development of new reproductive technology.

Take A Moment

This stunning time-lapse photography makes time suspend for a moment. Let the gratefulness flow into appreciating the blessings of nature, perhaps an antidote to loneliness.

Edging Forward: Achieving Sustainable Community Development

In Buddhist myths, it is within the void that we find new fertility. And according to the Biblical myth, God made the world ex nihilo. It is from the same nothingness that a new self emerges after the disintegration of an old personality. And many of us face a void during our life trajectory, through loss, tragedy and separation, and in my first book At the edge, I wrote about the void I faced at the loss of my beloved son, Danny James Frazer.

Making a Difference

Over the last decade I have spent a lot of time thinking about how to improve how we communicate our research to diverse publics, and get beyond the same old social bubles and filters. This article by the Guardian discusses which is better—climate hope or climate fear?

In Memory of Bravery

My father, Milton Clarence James Dale, was a celebrated second world war hero, Distinguished Flying Cross, No. 166 Squadron. He flew Lancaster bombers, and I was surprised a few days before he died in hospital that he yelled, Ann, be quiet, I can't hear bomber command. How much we learn about our parents as people through death, as I realized how dramatically the war must have affected a 17 year old who lied about his age when he first joined the RAF, for him to such vivid memories as he died. My father was a bit of a curmedgeon, and one day he called me up, and began to tease me.

Changing the Frame

Continuing the conversation, this is a very enlightening short video about a National Geographic photographer and a ‘deadly predator’.  The language we use and how we frame the issue, as foe or friend, determines whether or not we have a relationship or not.

Sustainable Development for Some?

Several years ago, the CRC Research team created a series of HEAD Talks videos featuring interview clips with Ken Lyotier. As the founder of United We Can, a charitable organization creating “economic opportunities for people with multiple barriers living in the Downtown Eastside” in Vancouver, he led the creation of the United We Can Bottle Depot.

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