Ecological Imperative

Plastic Waste May Soon Be a Thing of the Past

In the ocean, plastic has become a part of the food chain. According to Plastic Oceans, over 8 million tons are dumped into the ocean every year. We’ve all heard the alarming reports of whales consuming over 30 plastic bags or seen the deeply upsetting photos of turtles and birds caught in plastic beer rings. While certainly necessary, mass ocean cleanups just don’t seem to be enough to tackle this problem. So what can be done?

Symphonic Homage to Nature

“How happy I am to be able to walk among the shrubs, the trees, the woods, the grass, and the rocks — no one can love the countryside more than I do — for the woods, the trees, and the rocks give a man the inspiration he needs”.

—Ludwig van Beethoven

Keep Calm and Save Our Biodiversity

Invasive species are one of the key threats to biodiversity and ecosystems. Moving species beyond their historical geographic ranges, whether intentionally or unintentionally, can have dire consequences. Biological invasions are transforming the ranges of many habitats, which consequently helps accelerate climate change. One example of an invasive species that has had catastrophic effects is the Latin American water hyacinth. It was introduced in Africa, Europe, Asia, and New Zealand and now clogs rivers, starves fish of oxygen, and creates breeding grounds for mosquitos.

Let's all Breathe Easier

I have previously blogged on Victoria and Nanaimo's leadership on reducing plastic in the waste stream and its urgency for the sake of the lungs of the planet—our oceans. The United Kingdom has just banned the manufacturing of plastic microbeads in cosmetics and personal care products. Why is this important?

Let’s Stand Up for Nature

The Smart Prosperity Leader’s Initiative, a group of respected Canadian leaders from a range of sectors, recently launched their Let’s Stand Up for Nature campaign.

Re-Enchanting the Natural World

"Little astronaut, where have you gone, and how is your song still torrenting on?"

—Robert McFarlane, Lark Spell, The Lost Words

The Lost Words Book Cover

Toronto Farm Reconciles Ecological, Social and Economic Imperatives

Blog by Joanna Chin, Doctoral Student, York University-Environmental Studies

Blurring the Boundaries of Nature

Norwegian visual artist, Andreas Lie, blurs the boundaries of nature. Through double exposure photography, he blends landscape scenes with the wildlife that call it home. He transforms the texture of their fur and feathers into misty forests and snowy mountain peaks. Each portrait is contained within the stark silhouette of the subject with negative space occupying the backdrop. This effect reminds viewers that animals are inherently connected with their habitat.

Still-Life with Anthropocene and Climate

“I wish to illuminate the damage, the breakage, the fragmentation. Somehow, if I can make it beautiful, I can make it one again.”

— Anne de Carbuccia

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